Wild flower meadow

Yes we actually have a wild flower meadow over on Site One, plants such as Perennial Cornflower, Field Scabious, Ladies Bedstraw, Vetch, Wild Carrot, Yarrow, Trefoil to name just a few. The area is rich in wildlife providing a great source of food for many species including bees feeding off the nectar, dragonflies and later on in the evening the Brunel bats feeding off insects. The meadow will be cut soon and the material left to dry out a little before being collected. This is to reduce the nutrients in the soil and to control ta number of grass species becoming too dominant.

Sports Activity

Very busy over the last few weeks with school sports days,  athletes’ from various countries in preparation for world championships and also Jacksonville Jaguars running a training camp for a few days-two American football pitches marked up and then a quick turnaround for Women’s rugby Union England under 21’s v Spain, not to mention summer schools sports activities, summer pitches for football training and school holiday sports camps how do we fit it all in!

Pond Action

Lots of activity around the pond over the last week or so with damselflies and dragonflies in abundance, here is a picture of a female common darter on one of the floating reed beds


Where have all the flowers gone?

It’s near the end of June now and we are still waiting for our supplier to install the summer bedding in the planters at the Eastern Gateway, there have been a number of problems with germination this year with selected varieties so later sowing had to be made. Time for another push on refurbishment/replacement on our dilapidated greenhouse maybe.

Pond

Plenty of activity around the pond at the moment look out for the dragonflies and Damselflies flying just above the water, here is a picture of an Azure Damselfly at rest.


Bat walk/survey

Brunel Wildlife and Environmental Conservation Society took part over a couple of nights monitoring and listening to the Bats of Brunel, collecting data from the heterodyne detectors and recording the frequencies. This is the initial start to assess bat activity on campus at key locations and to see how healthy the population of bats are. More detailed studies are being planned where correct identification of species can be carried out and action plans put into place to protect these fascinating creatures .