Bat boxes

Over the next few weeks new bat boxes are to be installed on selected trees across the campus, hopefully our resident bat population, which are protected under law, will use them as summer roost sites as they forage round for food. We have recorded six species of bats across campus including noctule, common, soprano and nathusius pipistrelle, serotine and brown long eared. With the mixed habitat around campus there are probably more yet to be recorded, so these boxes will help us to monitor what we have on site and help to protect these fascinating mammals.

woodcrete bat box.

Meadows cutting

To maintain and enhance the biodiversity across Site one meadows it is essential to control the dominant plant and aggressive grass species. This is done by carrying out a suitable cutting and collecting regime twice a year which helps to reduce the nutrient level in the soil profile ,promotes a wider variety of wild flowers which in turn attracts a much wider variety of pollinating insects which are essential for the health of the planet.

Pond

Plenty going on in and around the pond, here is a female emperor dragonfly laying eggs on some of the debris floating on the surface, you will often see many and varied species of  damselflies and dragonflies around water bodies throughout the summer.

Tree work

Plenty of activity going on in the Sports centre car park, with the felling of two poplars which have been in serious decline to the point where they need to be felled, maintenance had been carried out over a number of years but with the hornet moth damage and fungal infection they needed to come down. With the pollarded Salix alba, these trees have also been managed over the years but with advanced decay and weak growing points it was time to heavily reduce again and remove the danger. As with all our tree work, any bat roost potential was checked out and monitored over a number of weeks prior to the felling. A replacement plan will be put in place  once confirmation of any Estates work has been completed.

Wildlife- Stag beetles

Do keep an eye out for our stag beetles on site, these are our largest native ground beetles and can be seen sunning themselves on walls and paths or on humid days around dusk time look out for the male, easily identified with the large mandibles (jaws) which resemble the antlers of a deer,  flying about  looking for a mate. Stag beetles are a protected species listed on schedule 5 of the Wildlife and Countryside Act 1981.

Male stag beetle

Wilfred Brown Building

New planting at Wilfred Brown bed is starting to grow now, the angles reflect the frontage of the building with section left for the STEM centre activities if so required .